Amputation saws

The amputation saw was a major part of any amputation set.  Without one, the set was seriously compromised.  The style and materials used to make an amputation saw are a key part of the detective work to identify a given set and in many cases to determine the approximate date of manufacture.  Saws from the Civil War era are distinctive in that the handles were non-metallic and many had a pistol grip shape.   The various shapes are obvious from the saws displayed on this page.

Amputation bone saw by Tiemann, ivory handle c. 1850

tiemnsw3.jpg (65308 bytes)

Amputation bone saw by Tiemann, gutta percha handle, c. 1880, pitting on the blade.  Priced accordingly.

tmnsaw.jpg (25915 bytes)

Plaster cast (not for bone) saw by Max Wocher, plated, c. 1899, (Listed in Truax and Greene, Chicago, 1899)

wocher.jpg (41573 bytes)

Metacarpel bone saw, after Benjamin Bell, c.1780 bowsw.jpg (15424 bytes)
Capital bone saw and metacarpal saw by V.W. Brinkerhoff, NY Brinckerhoff.jpg (25744 bytes)
Brass and steel capital bone saw c. 1850, by Goulding Brinkerhoff.jpg (60169 bytes)
Dr. Butcher's bone saw, c. 1851 swbutch.jpg (23684 bytes)
Amputation saw by Kuemerle, c. 1870 swkerm.jpg (16029 bytes)
Amputation saw by unknown maker.   Most likely post 1870 looks like a Gemrig type.  Pitting on blade, priced accordingly. swunk.jpg (15778 bytes)
Chain saw, c. 1860, ebony handles, one detachable for attachment to a carrier needle (shown below) which would be used to thread the chain around the bone to be cut or resected.  The carrier needle (dia. 2") has an "eye" in the tip for inserting a thread used to draw the chain around the bone.  Saw is in excellent to new condition. swchain.jpg (45741 bytes)

swneedle.jpg (30250 bytes)

A very rare c. 1880 Shrady's saw for subcutaneous section of the thigh bone. The instrument has an unusual angular handle cannula with in which the saw blade is drawn back and forth. Marked: Tiemann.  See Tiemann 1889, p. 111, fig. 1636 wsshrady.jpg (54559 bytes)
Dr. Rust's bone saw, c. 1881 swrust.jpg (16219 bytes)
Amputation bone saw by Teufel, 1860 swteufel.jpg (14444 bytes)
Post mortem saw, Coxeter, c. 1860 swcoxete.jpg (27631 bytes)
Bone saw finger1.jpg (12428 bytes)
Bone saw finger2.jpg (18961 bytes)
Finger saw finger3.jpg (20201 bytes)
Hey's saws which were used for cranial resection.  Above: a later Tiemann Hey's saw and below an 1870 Hey's saw by Kuemerle swhey.jpg (42293 bytes)
Amputation saw, English, marked W. H. Hutchinson, Sheffield, Instrument Maker to the Royal Navy.  c. 1850.  Handle is heavily decorated.

swenglsh.jpg (14500 bytes)

Amputation saw, Hungary,  marked Fischer, later 1800's

swfische.jpg (16461 bytes)

Small Amputation saw by Tiemann & Co., marked in oval on handle. swtiemn3.jpg (26433 bytes)
Amputation saw, Paris, Fr., Mathieu, marked 1881 swmath.jpg (19850 bytes)
Amputation saw, Kyn-Sheerer, Germany, c. 1910 swkyns.jpg (17127 bytes)
Amputation saw, Shepard and Dudley, c. 1870 swshdud.jpg (34841 bytes)
Metacarpal amputation saw, Shepard and Dudley, c. 1870 swshdud2.jpg (42351 bytes)
A c. 1870s lifting-back metacarpal saw by Shepard & Dudley, New York swsdmetacarp1.jpg (40670 bytes)swsdmetacarp2.jpg (39138 bytes)
A c. 1860s capital bow saw by Gemrig, Pa. swgemrig.jpg (45839 bytes)

 

bchainsw_small.jpg (15224 bytes)

A chain saw in "use"

 

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